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Miller, Trine


Main Office: AC 317
Phone Ext: 7317
COM Main Numbers: (415) 457-8811
  (415) 883-2211

Office Hours
RoomStart TimeEnd TimeMonTueWedThurFriSatSun
AC 317 12:30 PM1:00 PM

Organizational UnitPosition
English and HumanitiesInstructor

Current and Future Courses
TermSection (CRN)CourseDatesDaysTimeCampusRoom
Fall 2015 81080 ENGL 150 - Read & Composition (1A) 08/17/15-12/05/15 MW 09:40-10:55 KTD AC 105
81085 ENGL 150 - Read & Composition (1A) 08/17/15-12/05/15 MW 11:10-12:25 KTD AC 239
81349 ENGL 150 - Read & Composition (1A) 08/17/15-12/05/15 TR 11:10-12:25 KTD AC 114
82795 ENGL 150 - Read & Composition (1A) 08/17/15-12/05/15 TR 09:40-11:00 KTD AC 104
82795 ENGL 150 - Read & Composition (1A) 12/10/15-12/10/15 R 08:10-11:00 KTD AC 104

About me
I never planned to teach, but fell into teaching because of a couple of serendipitous events: getting my Masters at SFSU where I got an additional certificate in teaching composition, and taking a brush up lit class at CoM with the then head of English who became my mentor. Once I got my MA, I taught part-time at CoM for many years, and was hired full-time in 2015. I love what I do, and am more passionate about teaching, more curious and interested and excited about my work, my field, and helping my students, than ever.

My Philosophy
When I was a high school and college student, I remember thinking that writing was a mysterious process—not something concrete that could be consciously learned, but something that I would hopefully just get better at as time went on, through some kind of osmosis, or a talent that some people are just "born with." How wrong I was. Now, I am grateful to be able to teach based on the premise that writing is not a mysteriously transmitted skill, not a rare or innate talent, but a teachable and comprehensible activity we get better at with guidance and practice. Writing is really the result of thinking about the real world. To write well, we have to be interested in and curious enough about our subject to want to share our ideas. It takes time and experience, as do most things we want to become good at, but like most pursuits, the payoffs are huge. I see myself as a coach: helping students find their interests and feel compelled to write about them, teaching tangible lessons so students feel empowered to improve their writing, and finding as many ways as possible to make my classes and assignments fun. Learning is hard, but it can also be exciting.